This is how Venezuela Recovered from the July 22 Blackout

This Monday, July 22, at 4:45 p.m., a new blackout left the inhabitants of 16 states of Venezuela without electrical service. As we know, on March 7 and 23, Venezuela went through the first general blackout of this type, which were attributed to a combination of cyber and electromagnetic attacks , among other causes.

Although again we had to face problems such as the failures of Metro services, cell phone, Internet, drinking water and others, this time I feel that the country was better prepared to recover from these adversities.

By midnight Monday, the electric service had begun to be restored in parts of Caracas and several states of the country. By July 23 in the morning, almost every state already had one or more municipalities with electric service, and at night, most of the country had electricity. This compared to the March blackouts, in which it took several days to restore electrical service, was an improvement. This July 24 (which in Venezuela is a holiday to celebrate the birth of Simón Bolívar), shortly after noon, the Caracas Metro had already begun to function again. Everything indicates that this Thursday 25 will be a common working day.

RELATED CONTENT: Venezuela Recovers From Blackout as Guaido ‘Approves’ Military Treaty Reincorporation

On the causes of the electrical failure, the communication minister, Jorge Rodríguez, indicated, in an audio broadcast by the official media on July 22, two hours after the blackout , that “the first indications of the investigation in Lower Caroní point to the existence of an electromagnetic attack that sought to affect the system of hydroelectric generation of Guayana”, the main one in the country.

On July 24, the President of Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, reported on radio and television that “we suffered a high-frequency electromagnetic attack “(EMP) with respect to the blackout. He pointed out that “all the research, the diagnosis of this type of attack, how and where (it was carried out), I will present it to Venezuelans in the next few hours. The priority was to reconnect, recover and stabilize.

That same day, the Minister of Electricity, Freddy Brito Maestre, confirmed via Twitter that the system was the victim of acts of sabotage, although he did not provided details.

“On Monday the national electricity system was once again the victim of acts of sabotage tending to cause discomfort and anxiety to our population, they insist on trying to attack those who live in this land of glories, but they have met a people who knows its rights and is willing to defend at any cost. Since daylight Monday, CORPOELEC workers with patriotic essence, set out to defend our national electricity system, so for all and all my sincerest appreciation.
Let ‘s continue giving the battle that our liberating heroes began and we are sure that we will win! “

It is important that the Venezuelan government publish evidence of these acts of sabotage against the electrical system, and take measures so that they do not occur again.

RELATED CONTENT: Water Service Began to Normalize After the Blackout (Caracas)

As we have said on other occasions , those of us who live in Venezuela know of the terrible frontal harassment that our country has suffered this year by the US government.

It is not that there is no deterioration, inefficiency, maintenance problems or desertion of personnel in the Venezuelan electrical system, even corruption on the part of some individuals. But I don’t doubt the intentions of the US government to do the maximum possible damage to the electrical infrastructure, in order to make the Venezuelan population suffer even more. It has suffered greatly by the deterioration of its quality of life in recent years. And, in fact, the US government can use deterioration, inefficiency and maintenance problems to make it easier to sabotage. An interview published in June by RT, made by journalist Nazareth Balbas to four of the engineers who participated in solving the electrical problems of March in Guri, reveals precisely that scenario: there has been “sabotage by omission” and problems of lack of investment in the electrical system, which most likely facilitated sabotage actions from the United States.

Although no evidence has been published that this new blackout on July 22 was caused by an act of sabotage, different facts make us meditate on it’s cause:

  • That the blackout occurred on the eve of the six-month fulfillment of the self-swearing in of Juan Guaidó as the supposed interim president of the country, which occurred on January 23 in a demonstration.
  • That an incident occurred with a US spy and electronic war plane three days before the blackout, off the Venezuelan coast. Jorge Rodríguez, Venezuelan communication minister, reported that there have been 78 similar incidents with American spy planes so far this year.
  • That the celebration of Guaidó on July 23 required good attendance and overcoming the discouragement existing in the opposition base which now thinks that the leader of Popular Will is “more of the same.” He had called a “street session” in Las Mercedes, where he planned to “approve” the alleged incorporation of Venezuela into the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (TIAR), one of the ways by which they try to “legalize” a military intervention against Venezuela.

The rally in Las Mercedes finally had few attendees , despite copious calls from commercial radio stations, during the blackout, to participate in it taking advantage of discontent. However, the rejoining of the TIAR (that in reality does not have real repercussions inside Venezuela) was “approved” and he called for new demonstrations for the same week.

Finally, I want to emphasize that it is important to solve the situation with states like Zulia, whose population is tired and very unhappy because they have to suffer hours and hours of power cuts almost every day, even before the first blackout in March.

Source URL: Luigino Bracci Blog

Translated by JRE/EF

Luigino Bracci
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He is passionate about computer science since he was about 14 years old, at that age “a man gave me a small computer that he had bought in the eighties, of those that were connected to a television and had to be programmed to work (a Sinclair ZX81 ), and I really liked it.” On his political inclination, his parents were a great influence. “They were people of very humble origins, both emigrants, dissatisfied with injustice and inequality. But they were not militants of the left. I had many other influences, classmates in HS whose parents were on the left, as well as several teachers who were trained in the Pedagogical and gave us classes at a time as conflictive as it was the presidency of CAP and the military insurrection of Chávez ” He enrolled in the UCV and in 2006 he graduated in Computing, a career that he complements with popular communication in the digital field.

Luigino Bracci

He is passionate about computer science since he was about 14 years old, at that age “a man gave me a small computer that he had bought in the eighties, of those that were connected to a television and had to be programmed to work (a Sinclair ZX81 ), and I really liked it.” On his political inclination, his parents were a great influence. “They were people of very humble origins, both emigrants, dissatisfied with injustice and inequality. But they were not militants of the left. I had many other influences, classmates in HS whose parents were on the left, as well as several teachers who were trained in the Pedagogical and gave us classes at a time as conflictive as it was the presidency of CAP and the military insurrection of Chávez ” He enrolled in the UCV and in 2006 he graduated in Computing, a career that he complements with popular communication in the digital field.