The Third Decade

By Elías Jaua – Jan 31, 2021

The month of January of the year 2021 has ended. The first month of the first year of the third decade of the twenty-first century has elapsed. I take year one as the beginning of the decade, according to what is established in the Dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy (DRAE). Nevertheless, I invite you to delve into the interesting and historical philosophical and mathematical controversy about whether the decades are counted from year 0, or from year 1.

This third decade of the present century begins in the midst of the most widespread pandemic that has affected humanity in a hundred years; in a context of serious contradictions within the forces that dominate the world economy; a steep economic recession; a tremendous increase in poverty, misery and along with it the exploitation and abuse against human beings, especially women, children and young people; a growing and unstoppable negative impact on the gifts that nature provides us for our existence; threats of major warfare in most regions of the world; dismantling and/or non-recognition of the international legal order; dizzying leaps in artificial intelligence technologies that will give a new dimension to the world of education and work; a worrying development of leaderships and authoritarian and supremacist models of government and political-military control.

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With the lyrics of the singer Alí Primera I say: “But despite this image, pessimism does not win me over.” I am optimistic because I bet on the awareness gained in the first decade of the 21st century that another world is not only necessary, but also possible.

In the first 10 years of this century, a world of greater geopolitical balance was achieved as a guarantee of world peace; progress was made in raising awareness of human rights, especially the rights of women, children and youth; policies were scripted and established to slow down the negative impact that our race is causing to this earth to which we belong. Democratizing popular processes took place in our Latin America; effective policies against hunger and poverty were developed; appreciable progress was made in the processes of unity and cooperation with mutual benefits among nations.

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During the first decade a seed was sown, a seed that will break through and germinate fruitfully for humanity. Today more than ever from the democratic, popular and revolutionary left we have to accompany our peoples in the germination of this new flourishing of humanity.

The tasks of this time, for those of us who believe in socialist democracy, must be oriented towards the preservation of independence, self-determination, and the economic sovereignty of nations but with an integrationist vision; to fight for the real exercise of participatory democracy, for dignified and fair valuation of work and the massive production of essential goods for human beings; to promote and democratize innovation processes in education, science and technology so that the technological gap does not continue to widen; to generate awareness of the necessary and balanced use of natural resources; not to waver in defending the recognition of social and cultural rights in general and especially the right to equality in diversity; to continue persevering in the fight for a life free from any form of violence and in the construction of a society of freedom, equality, justice and dignity.

Let us turn this third decade into the decade irreversibly won in favor of the human cause. In that I firmly believe, that is why we continue to fight. To clear up the clouds from the horizon, heading for 2030. We have a decade to win!

 

Featured image: File photo courtesy of Elias Jaua Milano.

(Horizonte en Disputa)

Translation: Orinoco Tribune

OT/JRE/SC

Elias Jaua Milano

Elías José Jaua Milano is a Venezuelan politician and former university professor who served as Vice President of Venezuela from January 2010 to October 2012.He was Minister of Foreign Affairs since January 2013. Jaua obtained a Sociology degree from the Central University of Venezuela. In 2000 he was part of the Comisión Legislativa Nacional and Minister of the Secretaría de la Presidencia from 2000 to 2001.

He was nominated as Venezuelan Ambassador to Argentina in 2002. Jaua served as Minister of Agriculture in President Hugo Chávez's government before being appointed as Vice-President in January 2010, while remaining Minister of Agriculture. On 15 December 2011, following a major reshuffle of the Venezuelan political leadership, President Chávez proposed Jaua to be the PSUV candidate for governor of the state of Miranda (reported in El Universal).

He resigned the vice presidency on 13 October 2012 to compete in the election and was replaced by Nicolás Maduro. He lost the election on 16 December 2012 to the former governor Henrique Capriles who had stepped down in June 2012 to unsuccessfully challenge Hugo Chávez for President. Jaua succeeded Nicolás Maduro as Minister of Foreign Affairs on 15 January 2013.

Elias Jaua Milano

Elías José Jaua Milano is a Venezuelan politician and former university professor who served as Vice President of Venezuela from January 2010 to October 2012.He was Minister of Foreign Affairs since January 2013. Jaua obtained a Sociology degree from the Central University of Venezuela. In 2000 he was part of the Comisión Legislativa Nacional and Minister of the Secretaría de la Presidencia from 2000 to 2001. He was nominated as Venezuelan Ambassador to Argentina in 2002. Jaua served as Minister of Agriculture in President Hugo Chávez's government before being appointed as Vice-President in January 2010, while remaining Minister of Agriculture. On 15 December 2011, following a major reshuffle of the Venezuelan political leadership, President Chávez proposed Jaua to be the PSUV candidate for governor of the state of Miranda (reported in El Universal). He resigned the vice presidency on 13 October 2012 to compete in the election and was replaced by Nicolás Maduro. He lost the election on 16 December 2012 to the former governor Henrique Capriles who had stepped down in June 2012 to unsuccessfully challenge Hugo Chávez for President. Jaua succeeded Nicolás Maduro as Minister of Foreign Affairs on 15 January 2013.